The Village Maidens

The Village Maidens is an oil painting produced between 1851 and 1852 by French painter Gustave Courbet.

The Village Maidens is also known by the name Young Ladies of the Village.

This painting shows Courbet’s three sisters—Zélie, Juliette, and Zoé—strolling in a small valley near his native village of Ornans. The critics attacked it as a repetitive, graceless and traditional work. The painting followed realism as an execution style and first exhibited at the Salon of 1952.

The work can be viewed at Metropolitan Museum of Art

Artist: Gustave Courbet
Location: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Medium: Oil on Canvas
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Description

The Village Maidens is an oil painting produced between 1851 and 1852 by French painter Gustave Courbet.

Gustave Courbet was living around his home village in Ornans while painted The Village Maidens. The season was winter and he gave final touch to the landscape by omitting two large trees. The dimensions of the painting The Village Maidens were 194.9 cm x 261 cm or 76 3/4 in x 102 3/4 in.

The Village Maidens was a very large canvas painting which got accepted in 1852 to exhibit at the Paris Salon. Several critics attacked the artist for painting a tasteless, clumsy and berating the dress of the three women. The dog and the cattle was referred by them as ridiculous as the painting lacked focus.

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