Bacchus and Ariadne

Bacchus and Ariadne is a painting produced between 1522 and 1523 by Italian painter Titian.

This painting is considered as one of the prominent masterpieces of Italian Renaissance paintings.

Bacchus and Ariadne, one of his most famous paintings, tells the story of Ariadne, daughter of King Menos of Crete, who had subsequently been left on an island by her lover Theseus.  Bacchus, god of the grape harvest finds her leading a band of merrymakers with cheetahs pulling her in a chariot.  In his wisdom, he flies down and attempts to save her from possible death.

The scene, at first glance, seems somewhat chaotic, but if you look closely, you will see some defining areas that tell the story clearly.  Bacchus and Ariadne are separated from the group of revellers and brought into focus with the blue of the sky behind them.  While Bacchus is still partially pinned close to his companions, you can see his heart wishes to be with Ariadne.  Later, we learn that he marries her and gives her immortality.

The work can be viewed at National Gallery, London

Artist: Titian
Location: National Gallery, London
Medium: Oil on Canvas
Art Movement: Renaissance
Category: Tags: , ,

Description

Bacchus and Ariadne is a painting produced between 1522 and 1523 by Italian painter Titian.

Originally, an advance payment was given to Raphael for producing the subject of Triumph of Bacchus. But, Raphael died in 1520 and at that time only a preliminary drawing was completed. The commission was then handed to Titian

The scene, at first glance, seems somewhat chaotic, but if you look closely, you will see some defining areas that tell the story clearly.  Bacchus and Ariadne are separated from the group of revellers and brought into focus with the blue of the sky behind them.  While Bacchus is still partially pinned close to his companions, you can see his heart wishes to be with Ariadne.  Later, we learn that he marries her and gives her immortality.

The composition is divided diagonally into two triangles, using the expensive ultramarine pigment which depicts blue sky and the two lovers caught in movement. Other is a riot of the movement, which uses green and brown. Pigments used by Titian have been undertaken for analysis by scientists at the National Gallery in London. Titian had been working on Bacchus and Ariadne for almost three years, as recorded in the history

 

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